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Tag: family tree

Name variations? What about last AND first name variations?

In 1635 my 10th great grandparents Crispin Hooper and Rebecca Leere married at Charleton in Devon; it was a second marriage for both of them. Both were soaked in middle class gentrified heritage. Crispin had a coat of arms which Read more…


The Coachman’s Story: who were they?

Painting of a stage coach

The original role of the coachman took many guises. He may have worked on the stagecoach, the mail coach, for a doctor, for other professionals, or for families of the middling sort, and of course for the upper classes. It Read more…


Agricultural Labourers: stepping out from the shadows

Ploughing 20th century photo

Three decades or so ago, many family historians would have felt a tinge of disappointment to discover their ancestors were agricultural labourers. Possibly because those working within the farming industry of the 18th, 19th and to some extent the early Read more…


Unmarried mothers and illegitimacy in the 20th century

Much has been written about illegitimacy in the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries, but were things any different for the single mother in the early to mid-twentieth century? Yes and no might be the answer to that question. In the twentieth Read more…


Can’t find a birth certificate? A strategy for illegitimacy

Ancestry Research birth certificate

This is a general reference blog post. We cannot provide advice about how to find a birth certificate. You can of course commission a qualified genealogist to undertake research on your behalf. To hire a genealogist for assistance with locating Read more…


Pulling back the covers! How to blanket search parish registers

Cover of Hempnall Parish Register

In this blog I am going to discuss blanket searching parish registers in England & Wales and how it can benefit your research. I first heard the term used in the 1990s, but have not heard it mentioned much since, Read more…


Formularies – what are they and how can they help genealogists?

Draughtsmen's Alphabet

Everyday my mother spends an hour or two with her puzzle book. Puzzles keep her occupied, stimulated and challenged – she felt the same when she was researching her family tree. One of the skills she never harnessed fully was Read more…


New GRO Birth and Death Indexes (a game changer)

Family Records Centre

  The new general register office index is quite a game changer in terms of the history of researching ancestors using the Internet. For those of us who remember the old system (I'm only older enough to remember St. Catherine's Read more…